How to Deal with Angry or Unreasonable Customers

Customer Service Training Resource
November 6, 2012 — 1,454 views  
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How to Deal with Angry or Unreasonable Customers

There is a common saying in the United States: The customer is always right. This saying, however, is patently false; while customers are due respect and great service, they are not necessarily right, and they should not be able to dictate certain terms. However, those dealing with customers must strive to deliver great, friendly service even if the customer is angry or unreasonable.

The first key for dealing with an angry customer is to be patient. Irrational anger can make it difficult to remain calm, but keeping one's composure is a core step to succeeding as a professional who has to deal with customers. Keep firm with the company's policies, but try to address their primary concerns. It may not be possible to yield to their demands in full, but it is important to try to reach a fair compromise. However, it is important that customers are not rewarded for expressing anger; ensure that any special treatment or deals they receive would be given to a polite customer as well.

Those who work in customer service will also have to deal with unreasonable customers at some point as well. Again, it is important to remain firm about the company's policies and avoid offering special treatment for those who are unreasonable. Sometimes, it can help to explain that the business must make a profit and that the customer's demands would cost the company money. As with angry customers, it is sometimes best to simply explain that there is nothing the company can do to address their specific demands.

In all cases, it is important to realize that those in customer service can be expected to be treated fairly. Inappropriate language is not acceptable, and it is perfectly reasonable to inform a customer that he or she may not behave in an inappropriate manner. Threats of any sort are entirely inappropriate and can even be illegal. If the customer's behavior makes an employee feel uncomfortable, the customer should be asked to leave. In rare situations, it may be necessary to call the police.

Ultimately, dealing with customers involves remaining calm, fair and consistent. Angry customers often strive to make employees angry; the best way to combat this is to refuse to stoop to their level. Unreasonable customers are often looking for small inconsistencies to seize to that will let them complain to management. By remaining calm and patient, customer service professionals can help handle the situation as well as possible.

 

Customer Service Training Resource